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Richard P. Leary DD- 664 - History

Richard P. Leary DD- 664 - History


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Richard P. Leary DD- 664

Richard P. Leary

(DD-664: dp. 2,940 (f.) ,1. 376'5", b. 39'7", dr. 13'9", s. 35 k.
cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 10 21" tt.; cl. Fletcher)

Richard P. Leary (DD-664) was laid down 4 July 1943 at the Navy Yard, Boston, Mass.; launched 6 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. George K. Crozer III, and commissioned 23 February 1944, Comdr. Frederic S. Habecker in command.

Following shakedown off Bermuda, Richard P. Leary sailed via the Panama Canal for Pearl Harbor. After escort duty to Eniwetok and Saipan in July, she supported the landings at Peleliu 15 September, and at Leyte 20 October. During the Battle of Surigao Strait on the 25th, she launched torpedoes splashed one enemy plane, and guarded the damaged Albert W. Grant (DD-649). While patrolling off Leyte Gulf on 1 November, she rescued 70 survivors of Abner Read (DD-526). During the Lingayen Gulf campaign, she shot down one enemy plane 6 January 1945, and rendered fire-support for the landings on the 9th. She again supplied gunfire support for the landings at Iwo Jima 19 February and for the landings at Okinawa 1 April. During the night of 6-7 April she escorted the damaged Morris (DD-417) to Kerama Retto Okinawa Gunto. Upon completion of duties at Okinawa her next assignment took her to Adak, Alaska, in August. After serving in the Aleutians, she sailed for Japan arriving at Ominato, 8 September. She departed Japan on the 30th, and steamed to San Diego, Calif.

Designated for inactivation after her return, she decommissioned 10 December 1946, and was assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Richard P. Leary was transferred 10 March 1959 to Japan, in whose Navy she became Yugure and serves into 1974.

Richard P. Leary received six battle stars for World War II service.


Richard P. Leary DD- 664 - History

(DD-664: dp. 2,940 (f.) l. 376'5", b. 39'7", dr. 13'9", s. 35 k. cpl. 329 a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 10 21" tt., cl. Fletcher)

Richard P. Leary (DD-664) was laid down 4 July 1943 at the Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. launched 6 October 1943 sponsored by Mrs. George K. Crozer III and commissioned 23 February 1944, Comdr. Frederic S. Habecker in command.

Following shakedown off Bermuda, Richard P. Leary sailed via the Panama Canal for Pearl Harbor. After escort duty to Eniwetok and Saipan in July, she supported the landings at Peleliu 15 September, and at Leyte 20 October. During the Battle of Surigao Strait on the 25th, she launched torpedoes splashed one enemy plane, and guarded the damaged Albert W. Grant (DD-649). While patrolling off Leyte Gulf on 1 November, she rescued 70 survivors of Abner Read (DD-526). During the Lingayen Gulf campaign, she shot down one enemy plane 6 January 1945, and rendered fire-support for the landings on the 9th. She again supplied gunfire support for the landings at Iwo Jima 19 February and for the landings at Okinawa 1 April. During the night of 6-7 April she escorted the damaged Morris (DD-417) to Kerama Retto Okinawa Gunto. Upon completion of duties at Okinawa her next assignment took her to Adak, Alaska, in August. After serving in the Aleutians, she sailed for Japan arriving at Ominato, 8 September. She departed Japan on the 30th, and steamed to San Diego, Calif

Designated for inactivation after her return, she decommissioned 10 December 1946, and was assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Richard P. Leary was transferred 10 March 1959 to Japan, in whose Navy she became Yugure and serves into 1974.


RICHARD P LEARY DD 664

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Fletcher Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid July 4 1943 - Launched October 6 1943

Struck from Naval Register March 18 1974

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each name and/or commissioning period. Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Richard P. Leary (DD-664)

Launched on 6 October 1943, the Fletcher (DD-445)-class destroyer USS Richard P. Leary (DD-664) was built by the Boston Navy Yard and commissioned into Navy service on 23 February 1944. As a part of the Third Fleet, she assisted with the bombardment of Peleliu and the Palau islands in the autumn of 1944.

On 25 October 1944, she took part in attacks against Japanese warships and successfully hit the battleship Fuso with two torpedoes, contributing to the eventual destruction of that massive warship. The Richard P. Leary's sister ship, the A. W. Grant (DD-649), suffered severe damage during the battle, and the Richard P. Leary sailed to the wounded vessel's side, rendering damage control and defense and driving away enemy air attacks with her antiaircraft fire. On 1 November 1944, another American ship, the Abner Read (DD-526) was sinking after a kamikaze attack, and the Richard P. Leary again sailed to the rescue, helping to recover dozens of survivors. Soon afterward, she successfully engaged a submarine and numerous incoming aircraft.


Contents

Richard P. Leary was commissioned 23 February 1944, Commander Frederic S. Habecker in command.

World War II

Following shakedown off Bermuda, Richard P. Leary sailed via the Panama Canal for Pearl Harbor. After escort duty to Eniwetok and Saipan in July, she supported the landings at Peleliu 15 September 1944, and at Leyte 20 October. During the Battle of Surigao Strait on 25 October, she launched torpedoes at the Japanese battleship Yamashiro, splashed one enemy plane, and guarded the damaged destroyer USS Albert W. Grant. While patrolling off Leyte Gulf on 1 November, she rescued 70 survivors of the destroyer USS Abner Read.

During the Lingayen Gulf campaign, Richard P. Leary on 6 January, during a suicide attack, she severely damaged an incoming Nakajima J1N "Irving" fighter, which managed to graze the forward 5-inch gun mounts before crashing—the only damage of the war. Later that day, she also shot down a Nakajima B6N “Jill” and rendered fire-support for the landings on 9 January. She again supplied gunfire support for the landings at Iwo Jima 19 February and for the landings at Okinawa on 1 April. During the night of 6–7 April she escorted the damaged destroyer USS Morris to Kerama Retto, Okinawa Gunto. Upon completion of duties at Okinawa her next assignment took her to Adak, Alaska, in August. After serving in the Aleutians, Leary sailed for Japan arriving at Ominato, 8 September. She departed Japan on 30 September, and steamed to San Diego, California.

Designated for inactivation after her return, Richard P. Leary decommissioned 10 December 1946, and was assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

Postwar

Richard P. Leary, along with her sister ship, USS Heywood L. Edwards (DD-663), was transferred 10 March 1959 to Japan, where she served in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force as JDS Yūgure (DD-184) ("Autumn Twilight").

The ship was returned to U.S. custody 10 March 1974, stricken from the U.S. Naval Vessel Register on 18 March, and sold for scrap 1 July 1976.

Richard P. Leary received six battle stars for World War II service.


DD-664 Richard P Leary

Richard P. Leary (DD-664) was laid down 4 July 1943 at the Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. launched 6 October 1943 sponsored by Mrs. George K. Crozer III and commissioned 23 February 1944, Comdr. Frederic S. Habecker in command.

Following shakedown off Bermuda, Richard P. Leary sailed via the Panama Canal for Pearl Harbor. After escort duty to Eniwetok and Saipan in July, she supported the landings at Peleliu 15 September, and at Leyte 20 October. During the Battle of Surigao Strait on the 25th, she launched torpedoes splashed one enemy plane, and guarded the damaged Albert W. Grant (DD-649). While patrolling off Leyte Gulf on 1 November, she rescued 70 survivors of Abner Read (DD-526). During the Lingayen Gulf campaign, she shot down one enemy plane 6 January 1945, and rendered fire-support for the landings on the 9th. She again supplied gunfire support for the landings at Iwo Jima 19 February and for the landings at Okinawa 1 April. During the night of 6-7 April she escorted the damaged Morris (DD-417) to Kerama Retto Okinawa Gunto. Upon completion of duties at Okinawa her next assignment took her to Adak, Alaska, in August. After serving in the Aleutians, she sailed for Japan arriving at Ominato, 8 September. She departed Japan on the 30th, and steamed to San Diego, Calif

Designated for inactivation after her return, she decommissioned 10 December 1946, and was assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Richard P. Leary was transferred 10 March 1959 to Japan, in whose Navy she became Yugure and served into 1974. Stricken from the USN list 18 March 1974 and sold to Japan, she was stricken and scrapped by Japan that year.

Richard P. Leary received six battle stars for World War II service.


USS Richard P. Leary DD-664

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WWII ship logbooks for RP Leary

Among my father-in-law's memorabilia discovered when cleaning out the attic is a log book of some sort for the RP Leary from May 7, 1945-Dec 17 1945. It is hard cover (green fabric) and entries are in pencil or pen. It's entries match war diary entries for the RP Leary, so this is not official. Rather it seems to be something kept (in the bridge?) and written by many hands, sometimes several different handwriting on the same day. I'm not sure what to do with this (beyond gleaning the info from it RE my fil's service at that time). Should it go to NARA? to a historical society? My father-in-law was a radar engineer on the Leary from late April to its decommissioning in spring of 46. He was assigned to DESCOMRON 56 who was aboard the Leary as flagship of the squadron. Just wanting to do what's right for this piece of history and not sure what that is. Thanks.

Re: WWII ship logbooks for RP Leary
Alex Daverede 31.01.2019 11:57 (в ответ на Lynn Dosch)

Navy ship deck logs and war diaries are related but different records during World War II.  Deck logs entries are created according to the ship’s deck watches (0000-0400 0400-0800 and so on) and are maintained on the ship’s bridge when underway or on the quarterdeck while moored or at anchor.  Both the Commanding Officer and Navigator (who is the Executive Officer in some ships) sign the deck logs. By regulation deck logs are submitted at this time to the Bureau of Naval Personnel. In time they were accessioned into the National Archives.

Ship war diaries are similar to the deck logs--they share some characteristics such as their arrangement by deck watches.  However, after signature again by the CO and Navigator, the war diaries were submitted up the ship’s operational chain of command, so for a destroyer such as the USS Richard P. Leary (DD-664), the war diaries would have been submitted to Destroyer Division 111 (DESDIV 111), then Destroyer Squadron 56 (DESRON 56), then to whichever task force or task group the squadron was assigned.  Ultimately the war diaries would reach the Fleet Commander level, ultimately heading to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). The war diaries are also considered to be historically valuable records and NARA has accessioned them.

What both deck logs and war diaries share in common is their source in the document you apparently possess--the &ldquorough” deck log.  The green bound books are a Navy staple (I’ve written in plenty of them during my much more recent service), and both shore stations and ships went through many of them.  On board ship it was the duty of the quartermaster of the watch to maintain the rough deck log, recording events and times as they occur, or at least as soon as possible, depending upon the nature of the event.  Afterwards, on a daily basis, the quartermasters turn the rough log over to one of the ship’s yeoman so that a &ldquosmooth” deck log can be typed up. I don’t know who prepared the war diaries--World War II examples I have seen are hand-written in pencil.

The status of the rough deck logs as Navy records has been long established--they are considered by the Navy to be temporary records, as the information they convey is captured (twice) in permanent records that NARA already maintains.  So please don’t send the log our way. It’s disposition is completely up to you. If you have a maritime museum in your area, you may want to consider donating it as a memento of World War II service, along with any other artifacts you may want to part with--this gives an exhibit some meaning and context.

Re: WWII ship logbooks for RP Leary

Thank you so much for this very complete and helpful answer to my question. We have a military museum in Madison WI and when I have finished scanning its contents, I will ask our local museum if they are interested in the original pieces I have found. If not, the deck log and other memorabilia will remain in my father-in-law's archive of war treasures. From your description, I'm sure we are talking about a deck log for the last 7 months of the RP Leary's active duty. Some of the writing and a cartoon figure drawn on the outside of the book are certainly in my father-in-law's hand. I know that he was sometimes the watch officer on his ships, so this makes complete sense.

Re: WWII ship logbooks for RP Leary

Dear Lynn,  My grandfather was a radarman 1st class on the Leary from commissioning to her inactivation after the war.  I have his original cruise book (diary and pictures) which I have scanned. Would you consider sharing the scan of the deck log with me?  I wonder if some of the pictures are of your father in-law.  What is his name?  Thank you, Joe


JDS Yugure (DD-184) [ edit | edit source ]

Richard P. Leary, along with her sister ship, USS Heywood L. Edwards (DD-663), was transferred 10 March 1959 to Japan, where she served in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force as JDS Yugure (DD-184) ("Autumn Twilight").

The ship was returned to U.S. custody 10 March 1974, stricken from the U.S. Naval Vessel Register on 18 March, and sold for scrap 1 July 1976.

Richard P. Leary received six battle stars for World War II service.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Richard P Leary DD 664

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Richard P Leary cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

Additional Bonus:

  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.
    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    Watch the video: Now is the winter of our discontent - Richard III by William Shakespeare (May 2022).